Professional Mental Health Care Is Important for Bipolar Disorder

A psychiatrist in Bellevue, Washington, Dr. Lester Sandman holds licenses to practice psychiatry in four states. Often, Dr. Lester Sandman works with patients who have explored prior treatments, such as medication and counseling, but have not achieved the desired results. Lester Sandman, MD, treats a broad array of conditions, including bipolar disorder.

According to the National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH), bipolar disorder often appears in the teen years or early adulthood, with approximately half of all cases manifesting in individuals before the age of 25. While no cure exists for bipolar disorder, proper treatment can help individuals manage symptoms over the long term. Effective bipolar medications, including mood stabilizers, antidepressants, and atypical anti-psychotics, are available, but not all individuals respond to these medications in the same way. In addition, since other mental health or addictive disorders can coexist with bipolar disorder, individuals may need to try different combinations of medications to find out what works best for them.

NIMH recommends that individuals with bipolar disorder seek out a mental health professional to get the care they need. Once in treatment, individuals should develop awareness of the warning signs of a shift into mania or depression, take medications regularly, and anticipate gradual relief of symptoms.

Training Your Brain to Deal With Stress

Lester Sandman, MD, receives referrals for patients with psychiatric conditions who have attempted to find help elsewhere through counseling, medications, and other treatments without success. On his website, Dr. Lester Sandman offers links to a variety of articles about mental and psychological health, such as Excel Under Pressure.

In her article titled Excel Under Pressure: Prepping for Stress Can Enhance Your Response, Megan Johnson describes a common problem when people face too much stress. In colloquial terms, they have a brain freeze. Johnson attributes the problem not to the working of the brain, although the prefrontal cortex is involved, but rather to people’s tendencies to ignore the capabilities of their automatic response and instead focus on the importance of the moment.

For instance, if a politician stands up in front of the camera, he or she may suddenly blank out on how to continue. Or, in another case, a student may do poorly on an exam after doing well on a practice test for that exam. They may have prepared well, but when it comes to the important moment, they focus on the consequences of that moment rather than the current task. In order to avoid this, Johnson suggests preparing for that important event with a situation that simulates stress, but at a lower level. That, she says, is enough.